New post The Bones of Avalon

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Hugh Paxton’s Blog has great pleasure in passing on this latest from Anilbalan. Today his Ghost Cities blog is having a look at Glastonbury. A strange place. I’ve been through it a few times, I have climbed the tor, met some of the mystics, haven’t bothered with the music festival (too damn muddy and rainy but apparently great fun) and next time I’m in England I’ll pop by and see how Glastonbury is getting on. Glastonbury will be getting on. I’m sure of that. It’s done it for years upon years. And it will remain doing so for many more years to come. Enduring. Read on!

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Subject: [New post] The Bones of Avalon

anilbalan posted: "Shrouded in Arthurian myth and rich in mystical associations, the town of Glastonbury was once one of the most important destinations for pilgrims in England. Now thousands flock here for the annual music festival and for the summer solstice on Midsummer’"

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New post on Ghost Cities

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The Bones of Avalon

by anilbalan

Shrouded in Arthurian myth and rich in mystical associations, the town of Glastonbury was once one of the most important destinations for pilgrims in England. Now thousands flock here for the annual music festival and for the summer solstice on Midsummer’s Day. Over the years history and legend have become intertwined, and the monks who founded Glastonbury Abbey, around 700 AD, found it profitable to encourage the association between Glastonbury and the mythical ‘Blessed Isle’ known as Avalon. Avalon was another name for the Otherworld, and was the place where King Arthur’s sword Excalibur was forged, as well as being the supposed site of his eventual tomb. Once Glastonbury and its conical hill, Glastonbury Tor, rising from a vast inland lake that covered much of present day Somerset, had been a sacred site of the Old Religion of the British Isles. Even today, it is a place where the very air is alive with the stuff of myth and legend. In Arthurian legend it was ruled by the enchantress Morgan le Fay and her eight sisters, every one of them skilled in the magical arts. Before that, it was said to be ruled by the dark Celtic deity Aballach. It has variously been called the ‘Isle of apples’ and the ‘Isle of glass’. In the Christian era, it was said to be the place where Joseph of Arimathea came carrying the Holy Grail in order to found Britain’s first church. All of these myths, legends and historical associations have inspired numerous fiction writers over the years, among them Phil Rickman, whose novel The Bones of Avalon, takes full advantage of this rich body of lore.

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anilbalan | August 10, 2014 at 2:00 am | Tags: Avalon, Glastonbury, John Dee, Phil Rickman | Categories: Book, History, Legend, Mythology, Writer | URL: http://wp.me/p1Pozr-nM

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