Anilbalan: New post Nine Ghosts for Christmas

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Hugh Paxton’s Blog has been WAITING for this one! Tenterhooks. Restlessness. Will he? Won’t he?

Anilbalan and his GhostCities Blog has enriched my life. It has made me a happy Hugh Paxton. The man has an extremely refined sense of what makes a good ghost story, or a story that invites the curious. There is not, and never has been, a post thrown out to the world by Anilbalan that has made me yawn, doze off or have a dull morning.

Christmas is upon us. I know that involves listening to carols sung by Americans, crowds of shoppers listening to those carols in shopping centres, and dear Gawd! Slade singing Here it is Merry Christmas!

Everybody’s having fun!

We have just returned from Chatuckak market laden down with strange seed pods, and far, far worse.

We have a bottle of sherry, a cake that might or might not explode if a naked flame approaches it. We have a tree and, thanks to Anilbalan we have the essential ingredient! The Christmas Ghost Story!

A very merry Christmas to all of you. Don’t forget the ghost story!

From: Ghost Cities [mailto:comment-reply@wordpress.com]
Sent: Sunday, December 21, 2014 9:00 AM
To: paxton.bkk@gmail.com
Subject: [New post] Nine Ghosts for Christmas

anilbalan posted: "If you’re looking for a ghost story to elicit a pleasurable shudder this Christmas, then you could do far worse than read the work of that oft-overlooked Edwardian scribe of the supernatural, Richard Henry Malden. His book of short stories Nine Ghosts (19"

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New post on Ghost Cities

Nine Ghosts for Christmas

by anilbalan

If you’re looking for a ghost story to elicit a pleasurable shudder this Christmas, then you could do far worse than read the work of that oft-overlooked Edwardian scribe of the supernatural, Richard Henry Malden. His book of short stories Nine Ghosts (1942) was compiled over many years and issued as a tribute to his long friendship with the writer M R James, who had of course been one of the most celebrated authors in this particular genre. One of the most appealing features of R H Malden’s ghost stories is that we are always conscious of the presence of Malden the narrator. We may be sure that it is Malden and not some fictional persona because of the brief and entertaining, if not always actually necessary, fragments of his own experience that are mentioned in his ghostly tales. This is also most likely a natural result of the fact that the tales were written to be read aloud – Malden was among those present at the auspicious first readings of the ghost stories of M R James at the celebrated meetings of the Chitchat Society at King’s College, Cambridge and remained forever affected by the experience. As Malden notes in his introduction to Nine Ghosts, "It was my good fortune to know Dr James for more than thirty years".

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anilbalan | December 21, 2014 at 2:00 am | Tags: Nine Ghosts, R H Malden | Categories: Horror, Short Story, Supernatural fiction, Writer | URL: http://wp.me/p1Pozr-ot

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