Archive for March, 2016

Thai Days: Easter Special

March 29, 2016

Fantastic! Nice shots, Chang.

On 3/29/2016 12:30 AM, Hugh Paxton wrote:

Thai Days: Easter Special

March 29, 2016

Easter comes to the empty houses in Thai Village! And it’s good to see!

From: Chang Htoo [mailto:chang19814@gmail.com]
Sent: Tuesday, March 29, 2016 10:39 AM
To: Hugh Paxton
We have alot of new generation birds in empty houses in thai village.

Renewable Energy Investments: Major Milestones Reached, New World Record Set

March 25, 2016

Hugh Paxton’s Blog is happy to be the bearer of good news. I always enjoy doing that!

Cheers from Bangkok!

Hugh

From: Tanawan Sarabuddhi [mailto:tanawan.sarabuddhi@unep.org] On Behalf Of UNEP Asia Pacific Regional News
Sent: Friday, March 25, 2016 9:56 AM
Subject: Renewable Energy Investments: Major Milestones Reached, New World Record Set

Renewable Energy Investments:
Major Milestones Reached,

New World Record Set

· Coal and gas-fired generation attracted less than half as much capacity investment as renewables last year;

· Renewables added more to global energy generation capacity than all other technologies combined;

· For first time, developing world investments in renewables (up 19% in 2015) topped developed nations’ (down 8%);

· World record total of $286 billion invested in renewables last year; makes $2.3 trillion over 12 years

Frankfurt / Nairobi, 24 March 2016 – Coal and gas-fired electricity generation last year drew less than half the record investment made in solar, wind and other renewables capacity — one of several important firsts for green energy announced today in a UN-backed report.

Global Trends in Renewable Energy Investment 2016, the 10th edition of the UN Environment Programme’s (UNEP’s) annual publication, launched today by the Frankfurt School-UNEP Collaborating Centre for Climate & Sustainable Energy Finance and Bloomberg New Energy Finance (BNEF), says the annual global investment in new renewables capacity, at $266 billion, was more than double the estimated $130 billion invested in coal and gas power stations in 2015.

All investments in renewables, including early-stage technology and research and development as well as spending on new capacity, totalled $286 billion in 2015, some 3 per cent higher than the previous record in 2011. Since 2004, the world has invested $2.3 trillion in renewable energy (unadjusted for inflation).

(All figures for renewables in this release include wind, solar, biomass and waste-to-energy, biofuels, geothermal, marine and small hydro, but exclude large hydro-electric projects of more than 50 megawatts).

Just as significantly, developing world investments in renewables topped those of developed nations for the first time in 2015.

Helped by further falls in generating costs per megawatt-hour, particularly in solar photovoltaics, renewables excluding large hydro made up 54 per cent of added gigawatt capacity of all technologies last year. It marks the first time new installed renewables have topped the capacity added from all conventional technologies.

The 134 gigawatts (GW) of renewable power added worldwide in 2015 compares to 106GW in 2014 and 87GW in 2013.

Were it not for renewables excluding large hydro, annual global CO2 emissions would have been an estimated 1.5 gigatonnes higher in 2015.

UNEP Executive Director Achim Steiner said, "Renewables are becoming ever more central to our low-carbon lifestyles, and the record-setting investments in 2015 are further proof of this trend. Importantly, for the first time in 2015, renewables in investments were higher in developing countries than developed.”

“Access to clean, modern energy is of enormous value for all societies, but especially so in regions where reliable energy can offer profound improvements in quality of life, economic development and environmental sustainability. Continued and increased investment in renewables is not only good for people and planet, but will be a key element in achieving international targets on climate change and sustainable development. ”

“By adopting the Sustainable Development Goals last year, the world pledged to end poverty, promote sustainable development, and to ensure healthier lives and access to affordable, sustainable, clean energy for all. Continued and increased investment in renewables will be a significant part of delivering on that promise.”

Said Michael Liebreich, Chairman of the Advisory Board at BNEF: “Global investment in renewables capacity hit a new record in 2015, far outpacing that in fossil fuel generating capacity despite falling oil, gas and coal prices. It has broadened out to a wider and wider array of developing countries, helped by sharply reduced costs and by the benefits of local power production over reliance on imported commodities.”

As in previous years, the report shows the 2015 renewable energy market was dominated by solar photovoltaics and wind, which together added 118GW in generating capacity, far above the previous record of 94GW set in 2014. Wind added 62GW and photovoltaics 56GW. More modest amounts were provided by biomass and waste-to-power, geothermal, solar thermal and small hydro.

In 2015, more attention was drawn to battery storage as an adjunct to solar and wind projects and to small-scale PV systems. Energy storage is of significant importance as it is one way of providing fast-responding balancing to the grid, whether to deal with demand spikes or variable renewable power generation from wind and solar. Last year, some 250MW of utility-scale electricity storage (excluding pumped hydro and lead-acid batteries) was installed worldwide, up from 160MW in 2014.


Additional energy generating capacity, 2015:

Renewables (excl. large hydro) 134 GW
Large Hydro: 22 GW
Nuclear: 15 GW
Coal-fired: 42 GW
Gas-fired: 40 GW

Annual global investments in renewable energy ($US):

$286 billion (2015)
$273 billion (2014),
$234 billion (2013),
$257 billion (2012),
$279 billion (2011),
$239 billion (2010),
$179 billion (2009),
$182 billion (2008),
$154 billion (2007),
$112 billion (2006),
$73 billion (2005)
$47 billion (2004)
12 year total:
$2.3 trillion
(unadjusted for inflation)

Developing countries on the rise led by China and India

In 2015, for the first time, investments in renewable energy in developing and emerging economy nations ($156 billion, up 19 per cent compared to 2014) surpassed those in developed countries ($130 billion, down 8 per cent from 2014).

Much of these record-breaking developing world investments took place in China (up 17 per cent to $102.9 billion, or 36 per cent of the world total).

Other developing countries showing increased investment included India (up 22 per cent to $10.2 billion), South Africa (up 329 per cent to $4.5 billion), Mexico (up 105 per cent to $4 billion) and Chile (up 151 per cent to $3.4 billion).

Morocco, Turkey and Uruguay all joined the list of countries investing more than $1 billion.

Overall developing country investments last year were 17-times higher than in 2004.

Among developed countries, investment in Europe was down 21 per cent, from $62 billion in 2014 to $48.8 billion in 2015, the continent’s lowest figure for nine years despite record investments in offshore wind projects.

The United States was up 19 per cent to $44.1 billion, and in Japan investment was much the same as the previous year at $36.2 billion.

The shift in investment towards developing countries and away from developed economies may be attributed to several factors: China’s dash for wind and solar, fast-rising electricity demand in emerging countries, the reduced cost of choosing renewables to meet that demand, sluggish economic growth in the developed world and cutbacks in subsidy support in Europe.

Still a long way to go

That the power generation capacity added by renewables exceeded new capacity added from conventional sources in 2015 shows that structural change is under way.

Renewables, excluding large hydro, still represent a small minority of the world’s total installed power capacity (about one-sixth, or 16.2 per cent) but that figure continues to climb (up from 15.2 per cent in 2014). Meanwhile actual electricity generated by those renewables was 10.3 per cent of global generation in 2015 (up from 9.1 per cent in 2014).

“Despite the ambitious signals from COP 21 in Paris and the growing capacity of new installed renewable energy, there is still a long way to go,” said Prof. Dr. Udo Steffens, President of the Frankfurt School of Finance & Management.

"Coal-fired power stations and other conventional power plants have long lifetimes. Without further policy interventions, climate altering emissions of carbon dioxide will increase for at least another decade.”

The recent big fall in coal, oil and gas prices makes conventional electricity generation more attractive, Dr. Steffens added. “However, the commitments made by all nations at the Paris climate summit in December, echoing statements from last-year’s G7 summit, require a very low- or no-carbon electricity system.”

* * * * *

For more information, please contact

Terry Collins, Tel: +1-416-538-8712; Mobile: +1-416-878-8712, tc

Angelika Werner, Head of Corporate Communications, Frankfurt School of Finance & Management, Tel: +49(0)69-154008-708, a.werner

Sophie Loran, Communications Officer, + 33 1 44 37 42 83, Sophie.Loran

Shereen Zorba, Head, UNEP News & Media; +254-20-762-5022; +254-788-526000 (m); +254-713601259; shereen.zorba

About UNEP

The United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) is the leading global environmental authority that sets the global environmental agenda, promotes the coherent implementation of the environmental dimension of sustainable development within the United Nations system and serves as an authoritative advocate for the global environment.

Established in 1972, UNEP’s mission is to provide leadership and encourage partnership in caring for the environment by inspiring, informing, and enabling nations and peoples to improve their quality of life without compromising that of future generations

Drawing upon the scientific evidence, priorities emerging from global and regional fora, and an assessment of where UNEP can make a transformative difference, UNEP’s work focuses on the following 7 cross-cutting thematic priorities: Climate Change, Disasters & Conflicts, Ecosystem Management, Governance, Chemical & Waste, Resource Efficiency and Environment Under Review. For more information, see: www.unep.org

About Frankfurt School and the Frankfurt School-UNEP Centre

The Frankfurt School – UNEP Collaborating Centre for Climate & Sustainable Energy Finance (the Centre) advances transformation to resilient low-carbon and resource-efficient economies by attracting new types of investors, in particular catalysing the financing of clean energy by the private sector, which has a pivotal role to play. The Centre’s work is designed to encourage and assist the finance community to scale-up current investment, or to take the first steps into new markets. A key part of this process is to enable the public sector to put in place policies, regulations and initiatives that overcome existing or perceived investment risks and other barriers seen by the private sector due to unfamiliarity with clean energy initiatives, particularly in developing countries. http://fs-unep-centre.org/

About Bloomberg New Energy Finance
BNEF provides unique analysis, tools and data for decision makers driving change in the energy system. With unrivalled depth and breadth, we help clients stay on top of developments across the energy spectrum from our comprehensive web-based platform. BNEF has 200 staff based in London, New York, Beijing, Cape Town, Hong Kong, Munich, New Delhi, San Francisco, São Paulo, Singapore, Sydney, Tokyo, Washington D.C., and Zurich. For more information, see http://about.bnef.com

· Coal and gas-fired generation attracted less than half as much capacity investment as renewables last year;

· Renewables added more to global energy generation capacity than all other technologies combined;

· For first time, developing world investments in renewables (up 19% in 2015) topped developed nations’ (down 8%);

· World record total of $286 billion invested in renewables last year; makes $2.3 trillion over 12 years

Frankfurt / Nairobi, 24 March 2016 – Coal and gas-fired electricity generation last year drew less than half the record investment made in solar, wind and other renewables capacity — one of several important firsts for green energy announced today in a UN-backed report.

Global Trends in Renewable Energy Investment 2016, the 10th edition of the UN Environment Programme’s (UNEP’s) annual publication, launched today by the Frankfurt School-UNEP Collaborating Centre for Climate & Sustainable Energy Finance and Bloomberg New Energy Finance (BNEF), says the annual global investment in new renewables capacity, at $266 billion, was more than double the estimated $130 billion invested in coal and gas power stations in 2015.

All investments in renewables, including early-stage technology and research and development as well as spending on new capacity, totalled $286 billion in 2015, some 3 per cent higher than the previous record in 2011. Since 2004, the world has invested $2.3 trillion in renewable energy (unadjusted for inflation).

(All figures for renewables in this release include wind, solar, biomass and waste-to-energy, biofuels, geothermal, marine and small hydro, but exclude large hydro-electric projects of more than 50 megawatts).

Just as significantly, developing world investments in renewables topped those of developed nations for the first time in 2015.

Helped by further falls in generating costs per megawatt-hour, particularly in solar photovoltaics, renewables excluding large hydro made up 54 per cent of added gigawatt capacity of all technologies last year. It marks the first time new installed renewables have topped the capacity added from all conventional technologies.

The 134 gigawatts (GW) of renewable power added worldwide in 2015 compares to 106GW in 2014 and 87GW in 2013.

Were it not for renewables excluding large hydro, annual global CO2 emissions would have been an estimated 1.5 gigatonnes higher in 2015.

UNEP Executive Director Achim Steiner said, "Renewables are becoming ever more central to our low-carbon lifestyles, and the record-setting investments in 2015 are further proof of this trend. Importantly, for the first time in 2015, renewables in investments were higher in developing countries than developed.”

“Access to clean, modern energy is of enormous value for all societies, but especially so in regions where reliable energy can offer profound improvements in quality of life, economic development and environmental sustainability. Continued and increased investment in renewables is not only good for people and planet, but will be a key element in achieving international targets on climate change and sustainable development. ”

“By adopting the Sustainable Development Goals last year, the world pledged to end poverty, promote sustainable development, and to ensure healthier lives and access to affordable, sustainable, clean energy for all. Continued and increased investment in renewables will be a significant part of delivering on that promise.”

Said Michael Liebreich, Chairman of the Advisory Board at BNEF: “Global investment in renewables capacity hit a new record in 2015, far outpacing that in fossil fuel generating capacity despite falling oil, gas and coal prices. It has broadened out to a wider and wider array of developing countries, helped by sharply reduced costs and by the benefits of local power production over reliance on imported commodities.”

As in previous years, the report shows the 2015 renewable energy market was dominated by solar photovoltaics and wind, which together added 118GW in generating capacity, far above the previous record of 94GW set in 2014. Wind added 62GW and photovoltaics 56GW. More modest amounts were provided by biomass and waste-to-power, geothermal, solar thermal and small hydro.

In 2015, more attention was drawn to battery storage as an adjunct to solar and wind projects and to small-scale PV systems. Energy storage is of significant importance as it is one way of providing fast-responding balancing to the grid, whether to deal with demand spikes or variable renewable power generation from wind and solar. Last year, some 250MW of utility-scale electricity storage (excluding pumped hydro and lead-acid batteries) was installed worldwide, up from 160MW in 2014.


Additional energy generating capacity, 2015:

Renewables (excl. large hydro) 134 GW
Large Hydro: 22 GW
Nuclear: 15 GW
Coal-fired: 42 GW
Gas-fired: 40 GW

Annual global investments in renewable energy ($US):

$286 billion (2015)
$273 billion (2014),
$234 billion (2013),
$257 billion (2012),
$279 billion (2011),
$239 billion (2010),
$179 billion (2009),
$182 billion (2008),
$154 billion (2007),
$112 billion (2006),
$73 billion (2005)
$47 billion (2004)
12 year total:
$2.3 trillion
(unadjusted for inflation)

Developing countries on the rise led by China and India

In 2015, for the first time, investments in renewable energy in developing and emerging economy nations ($156 billion, up 19 per cent compared to 2014) surpassed those in developed countries ($130 billion, down 8 per cent from 2014).

Much of these record-breaking developing world investments took place in China (up 17 per cent to $102.9 billion, or 36 per cent of the world total).

Other developing countries showing increased investment included India (up 22 per cent to $10.2 billion), South Africa (up 329 per cent to $4.5 billion), Mexico (up 105 per cent to $4 billion) and Chile (up 151 per cent to $3.4 billion).

Morocco, Turkey and Uruguay all joined the list of countries investing more than $1 billion.

Overall developing country investments last year were 17-times higher than in 2004.

Among developed countries, investment in Europe was down 21 per cent, from $62 billion in 2014 to $48.8 billion in 2015, the continent’s lowest figure for nine years despite record investments in offshore wind projects.

The United States was up 19 per cent to $44.1 billion, and in Japan investment was much the same as the previous year at $36.2 billion.

The shift in investment towards developing countries and away from developed economies may be attributed to several factors: China’s dash for wind and solar, fast-rising electricity demand in emerging countries, the reduced cost of choosing renewables to meet that demand, sluggish economic growth in the developed world and cutbacks in subsidy support in Europe.

Still a long way to go

That the power generation capacity added by renewables exceeded new capacity added from conventional sources in 2015 shows that structural change is under way.

Renewables, excluding large hydro, still represent a small minority of the world’s total installed power capacity (about one-sixth, or 16.2 per cent) but that figure continues to climb (up from 15.2 per cent in 2014). Meanwhile actual electricity generated by those renewables was 10.3 per cent of global generation in 2015 (up from 9.1 per cent in 2014).

“Despite the ambitious signals from COP 21 in Paris and the growing capacity of new installed renewable energy, there is still a long way to go,” said Prof. Dr. Udo Steffens, President of the Frankfurt School of Finance & Management.

"Coal-fired power stations and other conventional power plants have long lifetimes. Without further policy interventions, climate altering emissions of carbon dioxide will increase for at least another decade.”

The recent big fall in coal, oil and gas prices makes conventional electricity generation more attractive, Dr. Steffens added. “However, the commitments made by all nations at the Paris climate summit in December, echoing statements from last-year’s G7 summit, require a very low- or no-carbon electricity system.”

* * * * *

For more information, please contact

Terry Collins, Tel: +1-416-538-8712; Mobile: +1-416-878-8712, tc

Angelika Werner, Head of Corporate Communications, Frankfurt School of Finance & Management, Tel: +49(0)69-154008-708, a.werner

Sophie Loran, Communications Officer, + 33 1 44 37 42 83, Sophie.Loran

Shereen Zorba, Head, UNEP News & Media; +254-20-762-5022; +254-788-526000 (m); +254-713601259; shereen.zorba

About UNEP

The United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) is the leading global environmental authority that sets the global environmental agenda, promotes the coherent implementation of the environmental dimension of sustainable development within the United Nations system and serves as an authoritative advocate for the global environment.

Established in 1972, UNEP’s mission is to provide leadership and encourage partnership in caring for the environment by inspiring, informing, and enabling nations and peoples to improve their quality of life without compromising that of future generations

Drawing upon the scientific evidence, priorities emerging from global and regional fora, and an assessment of where UNEP can make a transformative difference, UNEP’s work focuses on the following 7 cross-cutting thematic priorities: Climate Change, Disasters & Conflicts, Ecosystem Management, Governance, Chemical & Waste, Resource Efficiency and Environment Under Review. For more information, see: www.unep.org

About Frankfurt School and the Frankfurt School-UNEP Centre

The Frankfurt School – UNEP Collaborating Centre for Climate & Sustainable Energy Finance (the Centre) advances transformation to resilient low-carbon and resource-efficient economies by attracting new types of investors, in particular catalysing the financing of clean energy by the private sector, which has a pivotal role to play. The Centre’s work is designed to encourage and assist the finance community to scale-up current investment, or to take the first steps into new markets. A key part of this process is to enable the public sector to put in place policies, regulations and initiatives that overcome existing or perceived investment risks and other barriers seen by the private sector due to unfamiliarity with clean energy initiatives, particularly in developing countries. http://fs-unep-centre.org/

About Bloomberg New Energy Finance
BNEF provides unique analysis, tools and data for decision makers driving change in the energy system. With unrivalled depth and breadth, we help clients stay on top of developments across the energy spectrum from our comprehensive web-based platform. BNEF has 200 staff based in London, New York, Beijing, Cape Town, Hong Kong, Munich, New Delhi, San Francisco, São Paulo, Singapore, Sydney, Tokyo, Washington D.C., and Zurich. For more information, see http://about.bnef.com

Smithsonian Photo Contest Winners

March 22, 2016

This lot? Not bad at all!

From: Brigitte Alpers [mailto:imagine2@iway.na]

Smithsonian Photo Contest Winners

The exhibit features jury-selected images that capture the beauty of America’s wildest natural spaces. The exhibit celebrates the Wilderness Act, an integral element of the U.S.A’s conservation efforts. Since its adoption in 1964, it has protected more than 109 million acres of American wilderness. The exhibit was selected from more than 5,000 submissions from throughout the U.S.A.

Red Fox

Denali National Park, Alaska

https://i0.wp.com/www.boredpanda.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2014/09/american-nature-photography-exhibit-wilderness-forever-smithsonian-11.jpg
Image credits: Dee Ann Pederson

Mountain Goat Kids

Mount Evans Wilderness, Colorado

https://i1.wp.com/www.boredpanda.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2014/09/american-nature-photography-exhibit-wilderness-forever-smithsonian-5.jpg
Image credits: Verdon Tomajko

White Pocket

Paria Canyon-Vermilion Cliffs, Arizona
https://i2.wp.com/www.boredpanda.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2014/09/american-nature-photography-exhibit-wilderness-forever-smithsonian-14.jpg
Image credits: Richard Ansley

Brown Bear, Katmai Wilderness

Katmai National Park and Preserve, Alaska
https://i1.wp.com/www.boredpanda.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2014/09/american-nature-photography-exhibit-wilderness-forever-smithsonian-3.jpg
Image credits: Robert Amuroso

Climbing the Summit

Pyramid of Sahale Mountain, Washington
https://i1.wp.com/www.boredpanda.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2014/09/american-nature-photography-exhibit-wilderness-forever-smithsonian-4.jpg
Image credits: Ethan Welty

Bald Eagle

Glacier Bay Wilderness Area, Alaska
https://i2.wp.com/www.boredpanda.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2014/09/american-nature-photography-exhibit-wilderness-forever-smithsonian-8.jpg
Image credits: David Bahr

Meadow of Wildflowers

Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming
https://i2.wp.com/www.boredpanda.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2014/09/american-nature-photography-exhibit-wilderness-forever-smithsonian-35.jpg
Image credits: John Richter

Snowy Owl

Otis Pike Fire Island High Dune Wilderness Area, New York
https://i0.wp.com/www.boredpanda.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2014/09/american-nature-photography-exhibit-wilderness-forever-smithsonian-7.jpg
Image credits: Scott Joshua Dere

Banner Peak

Alpenglow, California
https://i0.wp.com/www.boredpanda.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2014/09/american-nature-photography-exhibit-wilderness-forever-smithsonian-30.jpg
Image credits: Brad Goldpaint

Aurora Ridge Trail

Sol Duc Valley, Washington
https://i1.wp.com/www.boredpanda.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2014/09/american-nature-photography-exhibit-wilderness-forever-smithsonian-22.jpg
Image credits: Pablo McCloud

Aurora Borealis over Honeymoon Rock

Apostle Islands National Lakeshore, Wisconsin
https://i1.wp.com/www.boredpanda.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2014/09/american-nature-photography-exhibit-wilderness-forever-smithsonian-23.jpg
Image credits: Jeff Rennicke

Alaska Range

Denali Wilderness in Alaska
https://i0.wp.com/www.boredpanda.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2014/09/american-nature-photography-exhibit-wilderness-forever-smithsonian-25.jpg
Image credits: Tim Iken

Sandhill Cranes

Bosque Del Apache, New Mexico
https://i1.wp.com/www.boredpanda.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2014/09/american-nature-photography-exhibit-wilderness-forever-smithsonian-10.jpg
Image credits: Diane McAllister

Snowy Meadow

Mount Hood Wilderness, Oregon
https://i1.wp.com/www.boredpanda.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2014/09/american-nature-photography-exhibit-wilderness-forever-smithsonian-31.jpg
Image credits: Jarrod Castaign

Purple Sea Star

Olympic Wilderness, Washington
https://i2.wp.com/www.boredpanda.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2014/09/american-nature-photography-exhibit-wilderness-forever-smithsonian-6.jpg
Image credits: Thomas Bancroft

Peak Fall Colors

Ouachita National Forest, Arkansas
https://i1.wp.com/www.boredpanda.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2014/09/american-nature-photography-exhibit-wilderness-forever-smithsonian-24.jpg
Image credits: Laura Vu

American Alligator

Marjory Stoneman Douglas, Florida
https://i1.wp.com/www.boredpanda.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2014/09/american-nature-photography-exhibit-wilderness-forever-smithsonian-9.jpg
Image credits: Jenna Van Kley

Sunset Paddle

Boundary Waters Canoe AreaWilderness, Minnesota
https://i1.wp.com/www.boredpanda.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2014/09/american-nature-photography-exhibit-wilderness-forever-smithsonian-36.jpg

I hope you agree that they all are spectacular!!

Myanmar: forest destruction

March 22, 2016

On forest destruction. Quite powerful!

From: Chang Htoo [mailto:chang19814@gmail.com]

Myanmar forest.

Poetry!

March 21, 2016

We live

We die

I don’t know why.

International Forest Day!!!

March 21, 2016

Hugh Paxton’s blog suggests you hug a tree!

Project Leaf?

If you want to launch a campaign, something forceful, you don’t call it Project Leaf!

I despair!

Hugh

21 March 2016

International Day of Forests: the role of environmental security

LYON, France – As celebrated every 21 March, the International Day of Forests is a reminder of the role of law enforcement worldwide in protecting the environment, including from forestry crimes tied to corruption, illegal logging and timber trafficking.

Mobilizing governments and stakeholders to translate commitment into action on the ground, INTERPOL’s Environmental Security programme brings decision makers to one table to promote environmental compliance and enforcement measures.

Its activities include Project Leaf, launched in June 2012 with funding from the Norwegian Agency for Development Cooperation (NORAD). In collaboration with the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), Project Leaf provides a coordinated global response to transnational organized crime affecting the forestry sector.

In 2013, Project Leaf identified corruption as a key factor in facilitating forestry crime in its report entitled Assessment of Law Enforcement Capacity Needs to Tackle Forest Crime. The project estimates the annual cost of corruption in the forestry sector to be worth some USD 30 billion in lost government revenue.

“Collaboration is required to combat all forms of crimes, including environmental crime which is associated with low risk and high profits,” said Tim Morris, INTERPOL’s Executive Director of Police Services.

“Corruption undermines not only the profitability and sustainability of the world’s resources, but also governance. It is used by criminal groups to establish ‘safe passage’ trade routes for the illicit movement of timber and other goods,” added Mr Morris.

Together with INTERPOL’s Anti-Corruption and Financial Crimes unit, Project Leaf is working to support countries’ efforts to address corruption in the forestry sector and ensure collaboration across relevant work areas.

“Corruption in the forestry sector is of particular importance given the close links with deforestation rates and the resulting impact on biodiversity loss, climate change, local community livelihoods and sustainable economic development,” said Davyth Stewart, Head of Project Leaf.

The value of the timber seized between 2012 and 2015 following Project Leaf’s operational engagement with INTERPOL member countries has been estimated at almost USD 1.7 billion.

An INTERPOL training course next month in Buenos Aires, Argentina will focus on addressing corruption in the forestry sector. It will gather forest law enforcement officers, anti-corruption investigators and financial crime police from South American countries.

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New post from TheGirl: Friday’s Peas Mashed

March 21, 2016

Fish and chips. Mushy peas! TheGirl’s going to find herself being English despite her more sensible instincts! But if she really wants to join the England clan it’s called fish and chips. Not fish n’ chips. Peas are mushy. Not mashed.

Buy a curry from a fish and chip shop. It’s nothing like a curry but it’s fun! You spill it on your trousers in the car.

I always opt for the jumbo sausage.

And the crisps, and two pickled eggs. The fish and chips as well. If I’m really feeling patriotic I order a soft drink that everybody else in the world stopped drinking fifty years ago.

I am describing a Cumbrian fish and chip shop. Located conveniently in Shap. Not a London fish and chip shop.

For fish and chips Shap is my advice!

Perfection!

Hugh

Over to TheReporterandTheGirl!

From: TheReporterandTheGirlMINUSTheSuperMan! [mailto:comment-reply@wordpress.com]
Sent: Monday, March 21, 2016 5:25 AM
To: paxton.bkk@gmail.com
Subject: [New post] Friday’s Peas Mashed

TheGirl posted: "Oy, if there is one thing I can get used to living in this country, its fish n’ chips. Despite how easy it is to make this dish, I’m pretty sure I have not had it since I’ve last been to the U.K. in 2007. On Friday, I had this plate for lunch and opted t"

Respond to this post by replying above this line

New post on TheReporterandTheGirlMINUSTheSuperMan!

Friday’s Peas Mashed

by TheGirl

Oy, if there is one thing I can get used to living in this country, its fish n’ chips. Despite how easy it is to make this dish, I’m pretty sure I have not had it since I’ve last been to the U.K. in 2007.

On Friday, I had this plate for lunch and opted to go with mashed peas (or peas mashed) as I cannot stand peas, and was hoping the fish would cover the taste. Alas, it did not ruin my desire for this simple but filling meal.

So Americanos, here’s a history lesson brought to you via Wikipedia:

Fish and chips became a staple meal to the English working class through the development of trawl fishing in the North Sea. This provided delivery of fresh fish to the urban areas throughout the U.K. The meal was originally served in a wrapping of old newspapers, but this practice largely ceased as a result of a European Union directives, thus plain paper, cardboard, or plastic are used instead.

By mid-19th century the dish became popular in London and southeast England, and we begin to see the opening of restaurants that serve this dish; this is especially significant as it caters to working class folks. So now people can come in and sit down and eat at an affordable restaurant.

Chicken and chips is another favorite that can be found at these same establishments, I have yet to try this dish U.K. style. However, if the Brits batter and fry their chicken the same way as they do their fish, then I am sold!

Despite the fact that I am not eating as much greens (leafy vegetables) as I used to in America, but more starchy type foods, I do not feel like I’m gaining weight. In fact, a pair of pants that I brought with me is very loose when I wear it. Strange, there must be some sort of European effect that I can’t explain here.

So other than my diet, I have been adjusting to life here on so-so terms. I am hoping that it will get warm soon, so I can witness the transformation of London that I keep hearing about. I’m tired of the complaining and hoping that people will get a little more chipper with extra sunlight.

I am still looking for my own flat. I placed an offer on Friday for what I thought would be a sure thing. But hours later the agent got back to me and stated the landlord found someone else. WTF! You’re the real estate agent aren’t you suppose to be looking for tenants, not the landlord?

Another week, another grind. Easter is almost here, the term is almost over, it’ll be time for me to sniff out new job opportunities as my contract comes to a close in a couple weeks. What can I say, but soon I’ll expect the unexpected as more changes come about.

So peas, fish, chicken, and chips? What’s your favorite comfort food, home or away?

Tell me @ReporterandGirl or on Facebook. Follow me on Pinterest and I’ll share it on my board!

TheGirl | March 20, 2016 at 6:24 pm | Tags: British Cuisine, comfort food, fish and chips, flat-hunting, food | Categories: Musings and Life | URL: http://wp.me/p2MqP7-z0

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